LawHelp.org/SC

Work and Disabilities

Legal Information

  • Americans with Disabilities Act Business Connection

    The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) is a Federal civil rights law that prohibits discrimination against people with disabilities in everyday activities, such as buying an item at the store, going to the movies, enjoying a meal at a local restaurant, exercising at the health club, or having the car serviced at a local garage. This web site contains information about the Federal laws that establish requirements for businesses of all sizes to accommodate the needs of disabled people. These requirements went into effect on January 26, 1992. Content Detail

    By:
    U.S. Department of Justice
  • Consumer Employment Program

    Through the South Carolina Department of Mental Health Consumer Employment Program, such as Individual Placement and Supports Supported Employment, Work-In-Progress, Vocational Rehabilitation Counselors and Job Coaches help people with mental illness seek, obtain, and maintain employment. Content Detail

    By:
    SC Department of Mental Health
  • Employment Discrimination

    There are several federal laws prohibiting employment discrimination against people with disabilities. These laws apply to all state and local government employers and to private employers with 15 or more employees. In South Carolina, employers are also subject to the South Carolina Human Affairs Law, which provides employees with disabilities the same protections as the federal laws. Content Detail

  • Reasonable Accommodations & Your Rights as an Employee

    The packet is designed to provide basic information about reasonable accommodation for employees with physical or mental disabilities. Content Detail

    By:
    Protection and Advocacy for People with Disabilities
  • The Red Book - A Guide to Work Incentives

    The Red Book serves as a general reference source about the employment-related provisions of Social Security Disability Insurance and the Supplemental Security Income Programs for educators, advocates, rehabilitation professionals, and counselors who serve people with disabilities. The Red Book is from the Social Security Administration web site. Content Detail

    By:
    Social Security Administration
  • Ticket To Work And Work Incentives Improvement Act Of 1999

    The Ticket to Work and Work Incentives Improvement Act of 1999 was enacted on Dec. 17, 1999. This new law: increases beneficiary choice in obtaining rehabilitation and vocational services; removes barriers that require people with disabilities to choose between health care coverage and work; and assures that more Americans with disabilities have the opportunity to participate in the workforce and lessen their dependence on public benefits. The provisions of the law become effective at various times, generally beginning one year after enactment. They are described in this document from the Social Security Administration web site. Content Detail

    By:
    Social Security Administration
  • Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), Title III

    The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) secures equal opportunity for individuals with disabilities in employment, public accommodations, transportation, state and local government services and telecommunications. Title III of the ADA applies to public accommodations, which are private entities that are open to the public. Content Detail

    By:
    Protection and Advocacy for People with Disabilities
  • Americans with Disabilities Act- A Guide for People with Disabilities Seeking Employment

    If you are seeking a job or are new to the workforce, you should become familiar with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (ADA), a federal civil rights law designed to prevent discrimination and enable individuals with disabilities to participate fully in all aspects of society. One fundamental principle of the ADA is that individuals with disabilities who want to work and are qualified to work must have an equal opportunity to work. This brochure, from the Social Security Administration, the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission and the Department of Justice answers questions you may have about your employment rights under the ADA. Content Detail

    By:
    Social Security Administration, EEOC and Department of Justice
  • Workplace Rights

    Rights of employees including public employees, tools for activists, other workplace rights resources. Content Detail

    By:
    American Civil Liberties Union
  • Disability Programs (Social Security Online)

    These web pages describe the different disability programs administered by the social security program including information about how to apply for benefits, how to manage the benefits you are receiving now, the different forms of health insurance that are available and other information. Content Detail

    By:
    Social Security Administration
  • Head Injury: A Family Guide

    Content Detail

    By:
    SC Department of Disabilities and Special Needs
  • Making Life Work After A Head Injury

    Content Detail

    By:
    SC Department of Disabilities and Special Needs
  • Americans with Disabilities Act

    The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) prohibits discrimination against people with disabilities in employment, transportation, public accommodation, communications, and governmental activities. The ADA also establishes requirements for telecommunications relay services. Content Detail

    By:
    U.S. Department of Labor
  • Working While Disabled - A Guide to Achieving Self-Support

    What Is A Plan For Achieving Self--Support? Basically, a plan for achieving self--support, or PASS for short, is a plan for your future. Many people with disabilities want to work, and you're probably one of them. But maybe you need to go back to school before you can get a job. Or, maybe you'd like to start your own business, but you don't have the money. Whatever your work goal may be, a PASS can help you reach it. This web page explains how the PASS works, how to apply for a PASS, and how a PASS affects your Social Security benefits. Thje website from the Social Security Administration provides help for disabled individuals on work-related issues. Content Detail

    By:
    Social Security Administration
  • Working While Disabled —How the Social Security Administration Can Help

    This booklet from the Social Security Administration web site explains: Part 1—Why We Want To Help You Return To Work; Part 2—What You Should Know About Social Security Work Incentives; Part 3—What You Should Know About SSI Work Incentives; Part 4—What And How You Should Report To Social Security Content Detail

    By:
    Social Security Administration