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Divorce / Annulment

Legal Information

Other Family Problems

Alimony Fact Sheet

Alimony (also called spousal support) is financial support paid by one former spouse to the other after a divorce or a legal separation. It is also be provided during the during the case. This fact sheet explains the details and process of alimony in DC.

Annulment Fact Sheet

A legal annulment is a judgement of the court that a marriage is invalid. A legal annulment cancels the marriage—the legal effect is as if the marriage had not taken place at all.

Divorce in Washington D.C. Factsheet

Divorce is the legal way to end marriage. The spouse who begins the divorce process by filing papers in the court is the plaintiff; the other spouse is the defendant. A divorce is either contested or uncontested.

Fee Waivers in Washington D.C. Fact Sheet

In D.C. Family Court, it costs $80 to start a divorce, custody, visitation or child support case. Once the case has been started, it costs $20 to file a counterclaim or a motion. There may also be other costs, such as witness fees or publication of notices. This two page flyer will explain how to get court fees waived in D.C.

Filing For A Fee Waiver

Information about how to get court fees waived in family law cases.

Frequently Asked Questions About Alimony

Basic information about alimony, also known as "spousal support."

Frequently Asked Questions About the Rights of Domestic Partners

This fact sheet covers FAQs for couples seeking information about domestic partnership. Same-sex couples who wish to marry can find more information at the Marriage Bureau of the D.C. Superior Court (http://www.dccourts.gov/internet/public/aud_marriage/main.jsf).

Handbook for People Who Represent Themselves in Divorce, Custody, and Child Support Cases

The court publishes this handbook to assist unrepresented individuals who have cases in family court in DC. It provides basic information about how the court works, how certain kinds of cases are handled, and what to expect during the course of a case.

Serving Court Papers in Washington D.C. - Divorce and Custody Cases

When you file papers with the court, all parties involved in the case are entitled to receive a copy. You, not the court, are responsible for getting the copies to them. This is called service of process. Different situations require different types of service.

Uncontested Divorce in D.C. Fact Sheet

If you and your spouse have agreed to everything in your divorce case and you both sign the necessary papers, you can obtain an uncontested divorce. “Everything” means that you agree about getting a divorce, and also about how you will resolve custody, child support, alimony, and division of property and debts. In other words, you have agreed that the court does not have to resolve any disputes between the two of you about these issues.

What Happens After I Have Served the Divorce Papers on My Spouse?

Steps to take after you have served your spouse with divorce papers.

What Happens at My Uncontested Divorce Hearing?

A list of questions the judge will likely ask in an uncontested divorce hearing.

What Kind of Questions Might the Judge Ask at My Uncontested Divorce Hearing?

A list of questions, with explanations, that you might be asked at an uncontested divorce hearing.

Divorce in Washington D.C. Factsheet

Divorce is the legal way to end marriage. The spouse who begins the divorce process by filing papers in the court is the plaintiff; the other spouse is the defendant. A divorce is either contested or uncontested.

FAQ: Can I Get a Divorce in DC?

A summary of D.C.'s requirements to get a divorce.

Filing for Divorce

A practical guide to starting a divorce case.

Filing Proof of Service in a Divorce Case

Information about how to file "proof of service" after you have served your spouse with divorce papers.

General Information About the Court and Divorce Procedure

Basic information about where to go for a divorce.

Serving the Divorce Papers On Your Spouse

Information about how the law requires you to give the divorce papers to your spouse.

What If I Am Served With Divorce Papers?

Steps to take if your spouse has served you with divorce papers.

Frequently Asked Questions About the Rights of Domestic Partners

This fact sheet covers FAQs for couples seeking information about domestic partnership. Same-sex couples who wish to marry can find more information at the Marriage Bureau of the D.C. Superior Court (http://www.dccourts.gov/internet/public/aud_marriage/main.jsf).

Getting Ready for Court

Frequently asked questions and answers on how you should prepare and what actually happens when you go to court.

Serving Court Papers

Information on your options when serving court papers.

Serving Court Papers in Washington D.C. - Divorce and Custody Cases

When you file papers with the court, all parties involved in the case are entitled to receive a copy. You, not the court, are responsible for getting the copies to them. This is called service of process. Different situations require different types of service.

Alimony Fact Sheet

Alimony (also called spousal support) is financial support paid by one former spouse to the other after a divorce or a legal separation. It is also be provided during the during the case. This fact sheet explains the details and process of alimony in DC.

Frequently Asked Questions About Alimony

Basic information about alimony, also known as "spousal support."

Annulment Fact Sheet

A legal annulment is a judgement of the court that a marriage is invalid. A legal annulment cancels the marriage—the legal effect is as if the marriage had not taken place at all.

Fee Waivers in Washington D.C. Fact Sheet

In D.C. Family Court, it costs $80 to start a divorce, custody, visitation or child support case. Once the case has been started, it costs $20 to file a counterclaim or a motion. There may also be other costs, such as witness fees or publication of notices. This two page flyer will explain how to get court fees waived in D.C.

Filing For A Fee Waiver

Information about how to get court fees waived in family law cases.

Child Support and Alimony from Military Personnel and Department of Defense Employees

Federal law authorizes the pay of active, reserve, and retired members of the military and the pay of civilian employees of the Federal government to be garnished (or attached) for the payment of child and/or spousal support. Go to this web page to find information about the process and location for getting a garnishment or wage attachment against any member of the military or any civilian employee of the Department of Defense (DOD).

Common Questions about the Uniformed Services Former Spouses' Protection Act

This document answers common questions about the Uniformed Services Former Spouses' Protection Act.

Getting An Uncontested Divorce

Steps for getting an uncontested divorce in D.C.

Uncontested Divorce in D.C. Fact Sheet

If you and your spouse have agreed to everything in your divorce case and you both sign the necessary papers, you can obtain an uncontested divorce. “Everything” means that you agree about getting a divorce, and also about how you will resolve custody, child support, alimony, and division of property and debts. In other words, you have agreed that the court does not have to resolve any disputes between the two of you about these issues.

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