Health Care for Military and Veterans

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Army Medical

This Web site provides an introduction to the U.S. Army Medical Department's headquarters organizations, which are the Office of the Army Surgeon General and U.S. Army Medical Command headquarters. It is intended for interested members of the public, news media and Army Medical Department beneficiaries.

Prescription Drug Programs For The Needy

A national non-profit information resource dedicated to helping people locate assistance programs to help them afford their medications and other healthcare costs.

Transition Assistance in the VA Military Services Program

About 215,000 to 225,000 people are discharged from the military each year. The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) has a long history of special efforts to bring information on VA benefits and services to active duty military personnel. These efforts include counseling about VA benefits through the Transition Assistance Program (TAP), a nationally coordinated federal effort to assist military men and women to ease the transition to civilian life through employment and job training assistance. A second component of the program, the Disabled Transition Assistance Program (DTAP), helps servicemembers separated for medical reasons. This document contains more information about transition assistance programs.

Exceptional Family Member Program

The Exceptional Family Member Program (EFMP) is a mandatory enrollment program that works with other military and civilian agencies to provide comprehensive and coordinated community support, housing, and educational, medical, and personnel services to families with special needs. An exceptional family member is a family member (child or adult) with any physical, emotional, developmental, or intellectual disorder that requires special treatment, therapy, education, training, or counseling.

Post Traumatic Stress Disorder Overview

PTSD is an anxiety disorder resulting from exposure to an extreme traumatic stress involving direct or indirect threat of death, serious injury or a physical threat. The trauma may be experienced alone (rape or assault) or in the company of others (military combat). The events that can cause PTSD are called "stressors." They include natural disasters (floods, earthquakes), accidental man-made disasters (car accidents, airplane crashes, large fires) or deliberate man-made disasters (bombing, torture, death camps). Symptoms include recurrent thoughts of a traumatic event, reduced involvement in work or outside interests, hyper alertness, anxiety and irritability. The disorder apparently is more severe and longer lasting when the stress is of human design.

Transition Assistance in the VA Military Services Program

About 215,000 to 225,000 people are discharged from the military each year. The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) has a long history of special efforts to bring information on VA benefits and services to active duty military personnel. These efforts include counseling about VA benefits through the Transition Assistance Program (TAP), a nationally coordinated federal effort to assist military men and women to ease the transition to civilian life through employment and job training assistance. A second component of the program, the Disabled Transition Assistance Program (DTAP), helps servicemembers separated for medical reasons. This document contains more information about transition assistance programs.

Emotional Responses to Traumatic Events

The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) has programs to help combat veterans deal with the emotional trauma of war. Those programs have enabled VA to become widely recognized within the medical community as a leader in assisting people deal with the aftermath of emotional events.

Post Traumatic Stress Disorder Overview

PTSD is an anxiety disorder resulting from exposure to an extreme traumatic stress involving direct or indirect threat of death, serious injury or a physical threat. The trauma may be experienced alone (rape or assault) or in the company of others (military combat). The events that can cause PTSD are called "stressors." They include natural disasters (floods, earthquakes), accidental man-made disasters (car accidents, airplane crashes, large fires) or deliberate man-made disasters (bombing, torture, death camps). Symptoms include recurrent thoughts of a traumatic event, reduced involvement in work or outside interests, hyper alertness, anxiety and irritability. The disorder apparently is more severe and longer lasting when the stress is of human design.

What is Medicaid and Who Is it For?

Medicaid is a jointly funded, Federal-State health insurance program for low-income and needy people. It covers children, the aged, blind, and/or disabled and other people who are eligible to receive federally assisted income maintenance payments. This web site provides basic information and answers to frequently asked questions about Medicaid.

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