Discrimination at Work

Legal Information
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Affirmative Action

For federal contractors and subcontractors, affirmative action must be taken by covered employers to recruit and advance qualified minorities, women, persons with disabilities, and covered veterans. Affirmative actions include training programs, outreach efforts, and other positive steps. These procedures should be incorporated into the company’s written personnel policies. Employers with written affirmative action programs must implement them, keep them on file and update them annually.

Age Discrimination

This page provides answers to a number of questions about age discrimination in the workplace, including: 1. What is age discrimination? 2. Which federal law(s) cover older workers? 3. Who is covered by age discrimination laws? 4. Which employers are covered by the law? 5. Are all older workers protected under the law? 6. What forms of discrimination or unfair treatment are illegal? 7. What are valid reasons for an employer to fire an older worker?

Americans with Disabilities Act

The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) prohibits discrimination against people with disabilities in employment, transportation, public accommodation, communications, and governmental activities. The ADA also establishes requirements for telecommunications relay services.

Employment Law Guide: Laws, Regulations, and Technical Assistance Services

This Guide describes the statutes and regulations administered by the Department of Labor (DOL) that affect businesses and workers. The Guide is designed mainly for those needing "hands-on" information to develop wage, benefit, safety and health, and nondiscrimination policies for businesses in general industry.

Employment Protections for the LGBTQ+ Community- Anti- Discrimination Law Map

This page contains a map of the states which have laws that prohibit discrimination in employment based on sexual orientation.

Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC)

Equal employment opportunity (EEO) laws prohibit specific types of job discrimination in certain workplaces. This web site contains information about (1) federal laws relating to: Age Discrimination, Disability, Ethnic/National Origin, Color, Race, Religion, and Sex; (2) Federal Financial Assistance Programs, (3) Veterans, and (4) Immigration.

Federal Laws Prohibiting Job Discrimination (Questions and Answers)

This webpage lists frequently asked questions and answers about federal laws that prohibit employers from discriminating against their employees and applicants for their jobs.

Federal Protections Against National Origin Discrimination

Federal laws prohibit discrimination based on a person's national origin, race, gender, color, disability, religion, or familial status. This document explains your rights in more detail.

How to File a Discrimination Charge

This web page, from the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) web site, shows you how to file a discrimination charge if you believe you have been discriminated against by an employer, labor union or employment agency when applying for a job or while on the job because of your race, color, sex, religion, national origin, age, or disability, or believe that you have been discriminated against because of opposing a prohibited practice or participating in an equal employment opportunity matter.

Race Discrimination

This page provides answers to a number of questions about race discrimination in the workplace, including: 1. What is race discrimination? 2. Which federal law covers race discrimination? 3. Who is protected under the law? 4. Can I be discriminated against because my spouse and friends are of different races? 5. Can I be discriminated against because of the color of my skin or by someone of the same race? 6. Are racial jokes or slurs against the law? 7. Can I be assigned to a particular kind of job, or to a certain neighborhood or territory because of my race?

Reasonable Accommodations & Your Rights as an Employee

The packet is designed to provide basic information about reasonable accommodation for employees with physical or mental disabilities.

Should You Tell Your Employer That You Are HIV+?

This document discusses some of the basic law relating to HIV+ status and when that information could be relevant to work. Many groups that advocate the importance of disclosing a person's status. Many people believe that keeping the information hidden can cause stress that is unhealthy. Others believe that letting coworkers and friends know is a way of putting a face on the pandemic, and thus taking a step toward widespread acceptance. Whatever decision you make, you need to make an informed decision about whether you should tell your employer and not simply tell your employer because you think you owe your employer a duty. This document describes your rights to keep the information confidential.

Take Action Against Employment Discrimination Against LGBTQ+ Workers

You can help make lesbian and gay workers safe from discrimination on the job. Statewide protections against workplace discrimination exist in only 14 states; in the rest of the country, employees fired simply for being gay have no legal recourse unless they work in a locality with its own anti-discrimination ordinance.

Whistleblower Fact Sheet

You may file a complaint with the Occupational Safety and Health Administration of the Department of Labor if your employer discriminates against you because you have "blown the whistle" - reported certain activities against your employer. This fact sheet provides more information about your rights.

Workplace Rights

Rights of employees including public employees, tools for activists, other workplace rights resources.

Employment Discrimination

There are several federal laws prohibiting employment discrimination against people with disabilities. These laws apply to all state and local government employers and to private employers with 15 or more employees. In South Carolina, employers are also subject to the South Carolina Human Affairs Law, which provides employees with disabilities the same protections as the federal laws.

Reasonable Accommodations & Your Rights as an Employee

The packet is designed to provide basic information about reasonable accommodation for employees with physical or mental disabilities.

Workplace Rights

Rights of employees including public employees, tools for activists, other workplace rights resources.

Americans with Disabilities Act

The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) prohibits discrimination against people with disabilities in employment, transportation, public accommodation, communications, and governmental activities. The ADA also establishes requirements for telecommunications relay services.

Employment Law Guide: Laws, Regulations, and Technical Assistance Services

This Guide describes the statutes and regulations administered by the Department of Labor (DOL) that affect businesses and workers. The Guide is designed mainly for those needing "hands-on" information to develop wage, benefit, safety and health, and nondiscrimination policies for businesses in general industry.

Whistleblower Fact Sheet

You may file a complaint with the Occupational Safety and Health Administration of the Department of Labor if your employer discriminates against you because you have "blown the whistle" - reported certain activities against your employer. This fact sheet provides more information about your rights.

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